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Scottish Parliament to Consider Abolition of Parliament Bill October 4, 2006

Posted by Philip John in Politics.
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The Scottish Parliament will, on Thursday 5th October, consider a legislative consent motion (also known as a sewell motion) on the Legislative and Regulatory Reform Bill (LRRB).

The Sewell motion has to be passed to allow legislation to pass at Westminster where the legislation affects the Scottish executive.

As a campaign, Save Parliament are opposed to part 1 of the Legislative and Regulatory Reform Bill because of the powers it gives UK ministers. The Sewel motion relates mainly to part 3, which we aren’t campaigning about. However, we would still like MSPs to speak and vote against the Sewel motion, to indicate their disapproval of the bill as a whole. Part 1 very much affects Scotland, even though it doesn’t directly affect powers of the Scottish Parliament.

Therefore, we would like to take this opportunity to encourage Scottish supporters of the campaign to write to their MSPs regarding this important issue and urge them to vote against passing the consent motion on the grounds that the bill would give too much power to MPs in Westminster.

You can write to your MSP using WriteToThem.com.

For more information please see the following sources:
http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Government/Sewel/UnderConsideration
http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Government/Sewel/LegRegReform
http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Government/Sewel/LRRBillsupplemental

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1. The View » Legislative and Regulatory Reform Bill - October 4, 2006

[...] A very dangerous bill is being proposed that will give MPs in Westminster the power to create and ammend laws without having to debate them in parliament. There are basically no safe-guards included in this bill so, to be flippant, Tony Blair could decide that he doesn’t like people from Kirkcaldy and make it illegal for them to be outside their homes after 18:00 with a punishment of jail time. The only check is on the maximum length of sentence (2 years) and that it may not introduce or raise taxes. Oh, and that the person proposing the law is “satisifed” that it’s in the country’s interest. No third party examination and debate of the changes to our freedom that could be introduced under such a bill. Perhaps one of the most rediculous facets of this Bill is that there is nothing in it to stop the Bill, when law, being used to modify itself to make it even more powerful. The reason I’m talking about this now in particular is that we, in Scotland, have an extra chance to stop, or at least slow down the bill in the Scottish Parliament before it reaches Westminster. A different section of the bill, in itself not disagreeable, affects devolved matters therefore the bill has to be given “legislative consent” by the Scottish Parliament before it can be presented as a whole to Westminster. A legislative consent motion to this effect is to be debated in the Scottish Parliament on Thursday October 5th. Unfortunately, I only found this out today but please, please write to your MSP and ask them to consider speaking and voting against this motion on the grounds that the bill as a whole will give too much un-checked power to Wesminster MPs. Tags:bill law parliament regulatory reform [...]


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